This is a lovely octagonal Georgian sewing or work box with so many attributes it's difficult to know where to start.

The box is octagonal in shape and veneered in beautiful yew wood in the centre of the lid is an oval inlaid panel with some cherubs in.When you open the box it has the original trade label on the inside of the lid. 'Bayley and Blew, Cockspur Street London'. Bayley and Blew were a small company based at 17 and 18 Cockspur Street in London. They are listed in the Directory of English Furniture Makers 1660-1840 as cabinet makers. Bayley and Blew specialised in dressing cases, portable writing desk and work boxes and were patronised by the king and the Duke of York.


 

The box is lined in the original pink paper and is divided into several sections. It still retains many of its contents including three whitewood thread barrels, The barrels were made with a central spindle inside, on which the thread was wound. The thread was then pulled out from a small hole on the side of the barrel. The small boxes had screw on lids and were used for holding beads, gold thread or other precious embroidery necessities. There is also a continuous multi reel winder, a netting roller, a small pin cushion box, a needle case and a working key.

 

Sewing boxes in the late 18th /early 19th century were a ladies private property often containing small pieces of sewing and private letters. There are three misers purses inside, probably made by the owner of the box and a few pieces of fabric, there is a tape measure, a box of long steel needles, 

This Georgian sewing or work box has so many exquisite features, it's difficult to know where to start. 


 

The box itself is octagonal and veneered in beautiful yew wood. At the centre of the lid is an oval inlaid panel with some cherubs. When opened, the original trade label sits on the inside face of the lid. This is a great feature to have immediately telling us when and where the box was from. The label reads 'Bayley and Blew, Cockspur Street, London'. 


 

Bayley and Blew were a small company based at 17 and 18 Cockspur Street in London. William Bayley was listed as a perfumer at 17 Cockspur Street, London, in 1779. In 1784, at the same address, the firm was listed as Bayley and Lowe. Then from 1799 to 1885 the firm was listed as Bayley Son and Blew. The company, in addition to its perfume business, made the finest quality small cabinets and writing slopes and work boxes and was patronised by the king George IV and Duke of York. 


 

The box is lined in the original pink paper and is divided into several sections. It has retained many of its contents including three whitewood thread barrels. These barrels were made with a central spindle inside, on which the thread was wound. The thread was then pulled out from a small hole on the side of the barrel. The small boxes had screw on lids and were used for holding beads, gold thread or other precious embroidery necessities. There is also a continuous multiple reel winder, a ratchet cylinder, a small pin cushion box, a needle case, skeins, a tape measure, a box of long steel needles, some wooden thread winders or buckles and some netting tools to name a few items. 

Sewing boxes in the late 18th /early 19th century were a ladies private property often containing small pieces of sewing and private letters. This box contains three misers purses inside, probably made by the owner of the box and a few pieces of fabric wrapped in tissue paper. 

Along with the box is a compliment slip with details about the box from an antique dealer, presumably where this box was purchased at sometime in its history. 


 

It measures 27.5 x 22 x 7.5cms.

This box came from a life long collector of sewing related items.


 

A Georgian Yew Wood Sewing Box - with contents

£0.00Price